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20120701
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps," "the global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we'll start with the economy. america, europe, and now even china are struggling. will it get worse before it gets better? will the euro finally collapse? is there still a danger of an oil shock? we have a great panel. >>> later in the show -- >> is russia to blame for syria's suffering? that is what my guest says. he is the head of the main syrian opposition group and is just back from moscow. we'll ask him whether he was able to get the russians to help out in ousting assad. >>> and what the heck is a higgs bozon and why should you care that astronauts found it? america's favorite astro physicist, neil degrasse tyson will explain it all. >>> first, here's my take -- america has had one more bad month for jobs. 80,000 created last month. this seems a depressing piece of a pattern. over the last two deca
of millions of people out of poverty, helped make american businesses more productive, given us amazing goods and services at cheap prices. but these forces make it much easier to produce economic growth by using machines and technology or workers in lower wage countries. hiring high-wage workers, that is workers in western countries, becomes a last resort. while one can disagree with the data, there is furious disagreement over everything else. on one side are those, mostly liberals, who say the economy is suffering from insufficient demand. that is, people in businesses are not buying things. the only cure is for the government to step in, spend money, and create demand. on the other side, conservatives argue the problem is not weak demand but obstacles on the supply side. businesses and people will spend if they're in an environment that requires them to do so, reducing taxes, increasing regulation. in general i accept that a country needs a structure of taxes and incentives that reward growth. but beyond this rhetoric, what specifically would help right now? one of america's best business
junior senator from maine still voting strong. be sure to join us next sunday when "state of the union" will air highlights of the debate i'll be moderating between the virginia senate candidates. republican george allen and democrat tim kaine. until then, thanks for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for analysis and web-only today's on itunes. just search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps," "the global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, fareed zakaria. we'll start with the economy. america, europe, and now even china are struggling. will it get worse before it gets better? will the euro finally collapse? is there still a danger of an oil shock? we have a great panel. >>> later in the show -- [ explosion ] >> is that to blame for syria's suffering? that is what my guest says. he is the head of the main syrian opposition group and is just back from moscow. we'll ask him whether he was able to get the r
in dealing with the israeli/palestinian issue and, second, that he's used drone attacks in afghanistan and pakistan to go after terrorists. in other words, the reason obama has lost some of his global popularity is that he's perceived as too pro-israeli and too hawkish. think about that, mitt romney. romney has tried to used the standard-issue cold war republican attack on democrats. the world is dangerous, our enemies are growing strong, obama is weak. the problem is most americans recognize that none of this is really true. the world is actually quite peaceful right now. our adversaries like iran are weak and isolated. china is growing strong, but it has not used its power to contest america in major national security terms. the one enemy americans recognize and worry about remains al qaeda andaffiliated islamic terror groups and obama has been relentless in attacking them. now mitt romney is a smart man who has had considerable professional success in his life. but even republicans, insiders have admitted to me that he has been strangely amateurish on foreign policy. his campaign, t
in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for analysis and extras. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itune, just search "state of the union." coming up in our noon hour, live coverage of mitt romney's speech in jerusalem. >>> this is "gps," the global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we've got a special and important show today. we will start with a powerhouse global affairs panel. tom friedman, paul wolfowitz, richard haas, anne marie slaughter on syria, iran, mitt romney, and president obama. later in the show, two of the world's leading economists, paul krugman and ken rogoff, go head to head on the most important economic matters of our time. the economy, the fiscal cliff, the euro and much more. >>> also, why in the world does the united states find itself number one on a top-10 list with yemen, iraq, and serbia? i'll explain. >>> but first, here's my take. mitt romney has picked a bad time to launch an attack on barack obama's foreign policy. as he was speaking to the annual gathering of the veterans of fore
calamitous would it be? harvard's economic historian niall ferguson will tell us. also, are you worried about global warming that this wacky weather? if your nation was just a few feet above sea level, you would be really worried. we'll talk with a former president of just such a nation. and why am i wiggling my fingers in a mirror here, to try to understand the wonders of the human brain. come along for an amazing tour. but first, here is my take. the attacks and counterattacks in this presidential campaign are, i suppose, inevitable. but let's be honest. they're largely untrue or irrelevant. whatever the paperwork shows, mitt romney was not running bain capital after 1999 and he if he was outsourcing jobs, it is not sleazy, it is how you run a business efficiently. on the other side, romney's recent claim accusing the president of shoveling government grants to his political supporters is so twisted that it earned him the washington post's fact checker's highest score for distortion. four pinocchios. his recent refrain that obama's views are foreign. >> this course is extraordinarily foreig
, france spends eight times less on treatments per person than the u.s. system. eight times less. or consider britain which handles diabetes far more effectively than the u.s. while spending less than half of what we spend per person. the study concludes that the british system is five times more productive in managing diabetes than the united states is. to understand this issue better, i spoke with daniel vercello of novartis and a physician by training. he's also frankly pro-market and pro-american, both of which have occasionally made him a target for some criticism in europe. he emphasizes there's no single model that works best, but he explained that france and britain have been better at tackling diabetes and lung disease because they take a syst systemwide approach that gives all providers an incentive to focus on early detection and cost-effective treatments that make wellness the goal. so i asked him, is the lesson that only the government can produce systemwide improvements? his brief answer is yes, this is a case where you need government action. you see, economists ha
. below all this mudslinging lies a real divide. obama has been making the case that the u.s. economy needs investment in infrastructure, education, training, basic science and technologies of the future. those investments in the pre president's telling have been the key in american growth and will help create jobs and invent the future. romney argues america needs tax and regulatory relief. he wants to cut taxes for all, reduce regulations, streamline government. all this in his telling will unleash america's entrepreneurial energy. both views have merit. and would make for a great campaign if the country had a sustained discussion around these ideas. then the election would produce a mandate to prove move in one these directions. i think obama has the stronger case. we do need a tax and regulatory structure that creates strong incentives for private businesses to flourish. the thing is, we already have one. the world economic forum's 2011-2012 global competitiveness report ranks the united states number five in the world and number one among large economies. whether compared with ou
, thank you very much for joining us. >> you bet. thank you, candy. >> if you'd like to help the victims of the colorado fires, visit cnn.com/impact. thank you very much for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. "fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we'll start with politics in the wake of the supreme court ruling on health care. what does it mean for the presidential race, for health care? what about economics? i've got a star-studded panel to discuss all this. >>> then we go overseas to egypt's election of muhammad morsi. what can we expect from an islamist president? two of the top egypt experts tell us. >>> next, how do you count and catalog 1.2 billion people? i'll ask the man creating a revolutionary biometric i.d. for every one of india's citizens. >>> also, the housing bubble caused the crash. will the coming housing boom finally power th
visit cnn.com/impact. thank you for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley. find us on itunes, search state of the union. fareed zakaria gps is next. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. we'll start today's show with american politics in the wake of the supreme court ruling on health care. what does it mean for the presidential race? for health care? what about economics? i have a star studded panel to discuss all of this. then we go overseas to egypt's election of mohamed morsi. what can we expect from an islamist president? two of the top egypt experts tell us. >>> next up, how do you count and catalog 1.2 billion people? i'll ask the man creating a revolutionary biometric id for every one of india's citizens. >> also, the housing bubble caused the crash. will a coming housing boon finally power this anemic recovery? >> first, here's my take. what to do about syria? western military intervention looked fraught with difficulties. but the situation on the ground is a humanitarian nightmare and is creati
the euro, how would it happen? and how calamitous would it be? historian neil ferguson will tell us. >>> also, are you worried about global warming with this whacky weather? if your nation was just a few feet above sea level, you would be really worried. we'll talk with a former president of just such a nation. >>> and why am i wiggling my finger in a mirror here? to try to understand the wonders of the human brain. come along for an amazing tour. >>> first, here's my take. the attacks and counterattacks in this presidential campaign are, i suppose, inevitable. but let's be honest. they're largely untrue or irrelevant. whatever the paperwork shows, mitt romney was not running bain capital after february, 1999. and even if he had been, outsourcing jobs to lower companies' costs and thus ensure its survival is not sleazy, it's how you run a business efficiently. is president obama suggesting that we put up tariff barriers to prevent outsourcing in the future? on the other side, romney's recent claim accusing the president of shoveling government grants to his political supporters is s
than attacking it. the u.s. has been bashing russia for shielding assad, coddling an apply at the cost of human lives, for arming the syrian military. some of this is true, some false. but all of it is unhelpful if the goal is to oust assad. unless the united states intends to ask iran for help. russia is the only country with any influence with the syrian regime. now the first thing to realize is the extent of russia's link with syria are limited. the economic ties are weak, russia is syria's ninth largest trading partner, accounting for just 3% of syrian trade. well behind the e.u., iraq, china. political bonds are not strong either. assad's first trip to moscow took place five years after he became president, well after he had gone to france and britain and turkey. this is not the behavior of a client state. russia's naval base at tartus is often described as highly strategic, yet it is rarely used. it's been allowed to crumble, no russian ship is based there. russia is the main arms exporter to syria, though its deliveries to syria are marginal, less than .1 what is sends to india
than attacking it. the u.s. has been bashing russia for shielding assad, coddling an ally at the cost of lives, some is true, some false, but all is unhelpful if the goal is to oust assad. unless the united states intends to ask iran for help, russia is the only country with any influence with the syrian regime. now, the first thing to realize is the extent of russia's links with syria are limited. the economic ties are weak. russia is syria's ninth largest trading partner. it's well behind the eu, iraq, china. political ponds are not strong, either. assad's first trip to moscow came place five years after he became president, well after he went to france, turkey, britain. russia's naval base is often described as highly strategic, yet it's rarely used. it's been allowed to scrcrumble. no russian shape is based there. it's deliveries to syria are marginal. less than a tenth of what it sends to russia every year. moscow could rush out and make their generals understand they could preserve the military if they assisted in dislogic the regime and moving to a democratic framework. that's
to cnn.com/sotu for analysis and extras, and if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on today's show, the presumptive president-elect of mexico, enraeon war, drugs, the economy. can mexico be the next emerging market star? >>> before that, aour truly global public square. we've assembled a panel to talk about the many international problems -- syria, egypt, iran, europe, and more. and on this july 4 week, we'll also look at america from the outside in. >>> also, who creates jobs? is it the 1%, or is it the middle class? we have a debate, a fascinating debate between two 1%-ers. >>> finally, tanks for the memories. a somewhat beautiful ballet by 50-ton ballerinas. ♪ >>> first my take. some believe the affordable care act, sometimes called obamacare, is popular only because americans don't understand it. there's some truth to this. studie
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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